Become an OTA Advocate

Advocacy

Advocacy – Image Source

Advocacy is the process of supporting a cause such as an idea, policy or activity, that can directly affect a person’s or group’s well-being.

The role of advocacy in Occupational Therapy is necessary not only for the strength of the profession but also for optimum care for clients. One way you can get involved in this profession is to become an advocate. Becoming an advocate helps to strengthen the care we have for the clients.

Call Your Representative

Call Your Representative – Image Source

There are two levels of advocacy: Informal and Formal. Informal includes writing or calling your representative for support, voting for officers of AOTA: American Occupational Therapy Association, informing your state representative about issues you may have, staying up to date on current issues via AOTA emails or blogs, and keeping your colleagues up to date on all the efforts for the profession.

Hill Day

Hill Day – Image Source

Formal advocacy efforts include attending AOTA Hill Day and your state’s Hill Day, attending local and state meetings, becoming a volunteer when needed, serving on committees, attending conferences, running for different offices, speaking to consumers and community groups about occupational therapy services, recruiting individuals to become involved in the profession, and serving as a mentor to new OTA practitioners.

A few advocacy activities that you can get involved in are Legislative Action Center, Political Action Committee and Awareness Campaigns. Legislative Action Center is an area of the AOTA’s website that allows you to voice your opinion to members of congress on important issues you want to fix and find answers and new solutions.

AOTA Conference

AOTA Conference – Image Source

Political Action Committee is used as a way to receive donations through members to elect candidates to congress, train OTs, OTAs and students, and gain local practitioners to help serve as campaign advisors, volunteers, and candidates.

Awareness Campaigns are used to build awareness and understanding of Occupational Therapy by using resources through AOTA brochures, visuals and audiovisuals that are all available on AOTA’s website.

AOTPAC

AOTPAC – Image Source

We encourage everybody to become an advocate today for the profession of Occupational Therapy. Go to AOTA.com for more information on how you can be an advocate today.

References:
Jacobs, K. (2016). Managment and Administration for the OTA . Thorofare, New Jersey: Slack Incorporated. Retrieved from http://www.aota.org

 

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AOTA Hosts Game-Changing Conference

Conference Students

Six Lewis and Clark Community College OTA students attend the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Conference.

Every year, Occupational Therapy practitioners around the world attend the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Conference. This is an opportunity for professionals to further develop their skills and increase their knowledge through workshops, research panels, and presentations to learn the most current methods and continue providing skilled therapy.

This year it was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was extra special because not only was it our first time attending the conference, but we also celebrated the 100-year anniversary of Occupational Therapy!

100-year celebration

The AOTA Conference celebrated the 100-year anniversary of Occupational Therapy.

Over the course of several days, six of us Lewis and Clark Community College Occupational Therapy Assistant students attended various presentations. As students, we felt our time would be most wisely spent in student-oriented sessions to help us better prepare for entering the workforce.

We attended discussion panels of new practitioners, prep sessions with tips for taking the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy exam, but in the end, several of us agreed that a lecture we attended by Brandon Siegel, CRP, was the most impactful of all the sessions we attended during the conference.

Mr. Siegel provided information on to help jump start a career in Occupational Therapy, and his approach to the topic was humorous and down to earth. Below is our condensed list of Mr. Siegel’s presentation with 15 game-changing tips to entering the Occupational Therapy workforce.

Next-Gen Occupational Therapists: Secrets to Entering the Workforce in Today’s Ever-Changing Environment

  1. Create relationships within the company – NETWORK!!!
  2. Document each Fieldwork experience (Disease, Treatment, Methods, Protocols, Patient Outcomes, etc.)
  3. Focus on your Productivity: HARD WORK PAYS OFF!
  4. Interview your coworkers to step up your game
  5. Resume (1-2 pages)
    • Needs to have licensure at the top
    • Goal: Hit key words, Disease, Treatment, Exposure (summary)
    • Summary of Qualifications: 1-2 pages
    • Brag about your exposure and experience
    • Fieldwork Level 1: 1-2 bullet points
    • Fieldwork Level 2: 2-3 bullet points
  6. Curriculum Vitae (CV) … Life story as an OT
    • Could be 20 pgs.….
    • Include only experience relevant to OT
  7. Get a LinkedIn Profile
    • Productivity:
      1. Copy of resume, 2 letters of recommendation (1 clinical, 1 character building) Sample documentation

** The quality of therapy is only as good as your documentation**

  1. Verify the job hours (e.g., PRN, Full Time)
  2. GPA is not relevant
    • Passing the NBCOT exam states you are qualified for entry level job
  3. Cover letter:
    • 2-3 paragraphs max
    • 1/2 – 2/3 page – Background information and your qualifications
  4. Don’t include an objective statement
  5. Start looking for jobs 6-8 weeks before the exam
  6. Put the most relevant information at the top of the resume
  7. Resume should include bullet points and minimal color
  8. Do your homework! Not only is the employer interviewing you, but you are interviewing them! The more you know about the employer, the better you can judge if the job opportunity and workplace is a match for you. Knowledge is power!!
AOTA Conference

L&C OTA students celebrated the 100-year anniversary of Occupational Therapy at the AOTA Conference in 2017.